Burn ban archives for: Thurston County

Thurston County Issues a Temporary Ban on Recreational Fires

Thurston County bans recreational fires Thursday 2pm through 8am Saturday in unincorporated parts of the County.

After consulting with the Executive Board of the Thurston County Fire Chiefs’ Association and the Thurston County Board of County Commissioners, the Thurston County Fire Marshal issued a temporary ban on recreational fires in unincorporated areas of Thurston County. The ban begins today, August 25, 2016 at 2 p.m. and runs through Saturday, August 27, 2016 at 8 a.m.

During the ban, all outdoor burning, including campfires, bonfires, fire pits and the use of charcoal briquettes is prohibited. Liquid gas or propane camp stoves that do not use solid briquettes and have on/off controls are permitted.

Thurston County has been experiencing a high number of smoke investigations and respiratory emergency responses, and County residents are being cautioned that the combination of extremely hot temperatures and dry conditions make it unsafe to spark fires at this time. The dry conditions also increase the risk that fires can spread quickly.

For further information, please contact County Fire Marshal Brent Butler at 360-628-0885.

Thurston County Issues Fire Ban following Excessive Heat Warning

After consulting with the Executive Committee of the Thurston County Fire Chiefs’ Association and the Thurston County Board of County Commissioners, the Thurston County Fire Marshal issued a temporary ban on recreational fires in unincorporated areas of Thurston County. The ban begins today, August 19, 2016 at 5 p.m. and runs through Sunday, August 21 at 8 a.m.

During the ban, all outdoor burning, including campfires, bonfires, fire pits and the use of charcoal briquettes is prohibited. Liquid gas or propane camp stoves that do not use solid briquettes and have on/off controls are permitted. County residents are being cautioned that the combination of extremely hot temperatures and dry conditions make it unsafe to spark fires at this time. The dry conditions also increase the risk that fires can spread quickly.

The County’s burn ban comes in the wake of the National Weather Service Excessive Heat Warning which was issued earlier this week for Thurston County and surrounding areas and the Department of Natural Resources amendment of an earlier ban. Temperatures are projected to be around 100 degrees or higher for some parts of the County.

On August 17, 2016, Public Lands Commissioner Peter Goldmark amended the previous burn ban issued on July 2, 2016, banning all outdoor burning with exception to camp fires and the use of charcoal briquettes. The amended burn ban now bans all outdoor burning including camp fires and the use of charcoal briquettes on all state lands.

 

DNR Bans all Recreational Fires and BBQs on state-protected lands — including State Parks

With the arrival this week of the most dangerous fire weather of the year, Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark is expanding the statewide burn ban effective noon today, Aug. 17 to prohibit all campfires on DNR-protected lands through Sept. 30, 2016.

“After a relatively mild summer, we are entering a period of critical fire weather on both sides of the Cascades,” said Goldmark. “The greatest fire danger right now comes from carelessness. It’s essential that people understand the risks involved and do not spark any fires.”

Goldmark sees special wildfire risk over the coming days throughout the state, as high-pressure weather patterns will keep away the marine moisture that normally limits the spread of wildfire. The ability of Washington’s forests and grasslands to resist wildfire remains weakened after last year’s record drought.

The statewide burn ban applies to state forests, state parks and forestlands protected by DNR firefighters. It prohibits all outdoor burning, including campfires in fire pits and the use of charcoal briquettes. Liquid gas or propane camp stoves that do not use solid briquettes and have on/off controls are permitted.

The statewide ban does not include federally-owned lands such as national forests, national parks, national wildlife refuges or other areas administered by federal agencies.

This fire season to date, there have been 527 fires on 3,372 acres. By comparison, at this point in 2015, there had been 803 fires burning 319,551 acres. In 2014 by this date, there were 590 fires burning 190,742 acres.

In 2015, a record drought, low snowpack and weeks of hot, dry weather brought Washington’s worst-ever wildfire season, burning more than a million acres across the state.

“Our fire crews have been effective so far this season in keeping fires small and getting them out quickly,” said Goldmark. “I ask all Washingtonians to give them a hand by being careful and responsible when working or playing on our iconic landscapes.”

DNR’s wildfire mission

Administered by Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark, DNR is the state’s largest on-call fire department, responsible for preventing and fighting wildfires on 13 million acres of private, state, and tribal-owned forestlands in Washington. During fire season, DNR’s wildfire force includes more than 1,300 trained employees. DNR also participates in Washington’s coordinated interagency approach to firefighting.

 

DNR Fire Danger Burn Ban in Effect STATE-WIDE

Outdoor burning off limits through Sept. 30
With the arrival of warm summer temperatures and below normal precipitation in western Washington, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has expanded its burn ban to cover the entire state.

The statewide burn ban will run from July 29 through Sept. 30. A burn ban for DNR-protected lands in eastern Washington has been in effect since July 2. The ban may be extended or shortened based on fire weather.

“The arrival of summer weather creates greater danger for wildfires, which are serious threats to safety, property and habitat. We have already seen a number of roadside fires start on both sides of the Cascades,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark. “We must be cautious and vigilant to minimize the damage to our state.”
The ban means outdoor burning is prohibited on all forestlands that DNR protects from wildfire. Anyone caught violating the burn ban can face fines. Prescribed ecological burns approved by DNR will be allowed if expressly approved by Commissioner Goldmark.
Recreational fires in approved fire pits within designated state, county, municipal and other campgrounds are allowed.
DNR’s burn ban does not apply to federally-owned lands, such as national forests, national parks, national wildlife refuges or other areas administered by federal agencies. Counties and local fire districts may have additional burn restrictions.
So far this year, DNR has had 408 wildfire starts throughout the state.
Fireworks and incendiary devices, such as exploding targets, sky lanterns, or tracer ammunition, are illegal on all DNR-protected forestlands.
For a copy of the Commissioner’s Order, go to http://www.dnr.wa.gov/burn-bans.
DNR’s wildfire mission 
Administered by Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark, DNR is the state’s largest on-call fire department, responsible for preventing and fighting wildfires on 13 million acres of private, state, and tribal-owned forestlands in Washington. During fire season, DNR’s wildfire force includes more than 1,300 trained employees. DNR also participates in Washington’s coordinated interagency approach to firefighting.
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