Burn ban archives for: Pacific County

Fire safety Burn Ban in effect as of July 9, 2018.

The Pacific County Department of Community Development  issued a Fire Safety Burn Ban in conjunction with local fire departments as well as the  and the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency

Fire Marshall Tim Crose says that the ban includes all outdoor burning other than recreational fires. All residential burning in conjunction with land clearing is prohibited until further notice.

Recreational campfires will still be allowed as long as they are within an improved fire pit in designated campgrounds. Campfires on private land will still be allowed if approved safety measures are followed.

  • The campfire shall be no greater than 3-feet in diameter and constructed of a ring of metal, stone or brick 8-inches above ground surface, with a 2-foot- wide area cleared down to exposed soil surrounding the outside of the pit.
  • The campfire shall have an area at least 10-feet around it cleared of all flammable material and at least 20-feet of clearance from overhead flammable materials or fuels.
  • The campfire must be attended at all times by a responsible person at least 16-years old with the ability to extinguish the fire with a shovel and a 5-gallon bucket of water or with a connected and charged water hose.

Completely extinguish campfires by pouring water or moist soil in them and stirring with a shovel until all parts are cool to the touch.

The use of self-contained camp stoves is encouraged as an alternative.

For more information, the county asks that you contact your local fire district or the Pacific County Community Development offices in Long Beach at 360-642-9382 or South Bend at 360-875-9356.

You can also call the Department of Natural Resources for updates on burn restrictions at 1-800-323-BURN or by visiting www2.wadnr.gov/burn-risk, or ORCAA at 1-800-422-5623 and www.orcaa.org.

DNR Lifts Burn Restrictions in Pacific Region effective Oct. 1, 2017

Effective 0001 October 11, 2017 fire danger rating will be reduced to low.

If you have a written burning permit from DNR, burning is allowed subject to the conditions of your permit. For land clearing and residential backyard burning, please contact Olympic Region Clean Air Agency at 1-800-422-5623 for burning regulations.

If you have questions or would like to obtain a DNR burning permit for silvicultural burning, please call Olympic Region DNR at 360-374-2800.

https://www.dnr.wa.gov/burn-restrictions

Pacific County Ban on Residential Burning LIFTED effective Oct. 1, 2017

Effective 12:01 AM October 1, 2016, the ban on backyard burning is lifted.

All residential outdoor burning requires a permit. These permits are free, and may be picked up from the fire station in Ocean Park, Pioneer Market, Jack’s Country Store, and the Surfside Homeowners Association Office.

Fires must be no larger than 4 feet in diameter, and made of only natural vegetation. Larger burn piles must be inspected before a permit is issued. Burning barrels are not allowed in the State of Washington. Barbeques and campfires made with charcoal briquettes or seasoned firewood do not require a permit. Fires on the beach are also allowed, 100 feet west of the dune line.

Burn Ban Lifted

DNR eases campfire restrictions after rains

Other outdoor burning still prohibited due to continuing high fire danger

OLYMPIA – With rain and cooler temperatures easing fire danger across Washington, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is lifting restrictions on recreational campfires.

Effective 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20, campfires will be allowed in approved fire pits in designated campgrounds Washington lands protected by DNR.

Because forests and rangelands remain dry from the summer’s low precipitation totals, other forms of outdoor burning, such as debris burning, remain prohibited under the burn ban ordered by Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz.

“We’re thankful to have rain help wet our landscapes, but as we saw with a quick-moving fire east of Ellensburg Sunday evening, we’re not out of fire season quite yet,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz. “I urge everyone to check with their local authorities before lighting campfires.”

Check local restrictions

Counties and local fire districts may have their own continued campfire bans. Burn restrictions on federally-owned lands, such as national forests, national parks, national wildlife refuges or other areas are administered by federal agencies. Check local restrictions, campground signs or with campground hosts before starting a campfire.

For current information on burn restrictions, call 1-800-323-BURN or visit DNR’s webpage showing fire danger and burning restrictions by county: www.dnr.wa.gov/burn-restrictions.

Those choosing to have a campfire in allowed areas should:

  • Use an approved or provided fire pit only; don’t create a new one.
  • Keep the campfire small.
  • Keep plenty of water and a shovel nearby.
  • Never leave the campfire unattended.
  • To extinguish a campfire: drown with water, mix ashes, scrape partially-burned sticks and logs, and alternate drowning and mixing until cold. A campfire too hot to touch, is too hot to leave.

 More than 90 percent of Washington’s wildfires this year have been human-caused. As of Sept. 19, 2017, DNR has responded to 745 wildfires this year. Here is a year-to-date comparison of the last 5 years:

  • 2012 – 671 fires for 67,455 acres
  • 2013 – 722 fires for 126,027 acres
  • 2014 – 808 fires for 314,565 acres
  • 2015 – 953 fires for 753,104 acres
  • 2016 – 766 fires for 16,403 acres

Escaped and abandoned campfires are one of the state’s leading causes of wildfires, with an average of 105 fires started by campfires over the past five years. Washington also sees an average of 140 fires started by debris burning every year.

DNR’s wildfire mission

Administered by Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz, DNR is responsible for preventing and fighting wildfires on 13 million acres of private, state and tribal-owned forestlands. DNR is the state’s largest on-call fire department and participates in Washington’s coordinated interagency approach to firefighting.