Burn ban archives for: Kitsap County

Stage 1 Burn Ban Continues For King, Kitsap, Pierce, & Snohomish Counties

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 3, 2017

STAGE 1 BURN BAN CONTINUES FOR KING, KITSAP, PIERCE, & SNOHOMISH COUNTIES

All outdoor burning is prohibited until air quality improves

Significant wildfire smoke from British Columbia remains in our region, and is expected through Friday. The Puget Sound Clean Air Agency is continuing a Stage 1 air quality burn ban for King, Kitsap, Pierce, and Snohomish Counties.

This ban is in effect until further notice and is in addition to existing fire safety burn bans.

With winds from British Columbia moving wildfire smoke into our region, air pollution levels have become UNHEALTHY FOR SENSITIVE GROUPS and UNHEALTHY in many parts of Puget Sound.  We expect these conditions to continue at least through Friday and possibly longer.

The purpose of the burn ban is to reduce any additional harm to sensitive populations and the general public from excess air pollution, in addition to existing fire safety burn bans. The Clean Air Agency will continue to closely monitor the situation for purposes of air quality burn bans.

No outdoor burning during a Stage 1 air quality burn ban including:

  • No charcoal barbeques or similar solid fuel devices
  • No fire pits, chimineas, fire bowls, or similar free-standing devices
  • No campfires or bonfires
  • No fireplaces, uncertified wood stoves, or uncertified inserts*
  • No agricultural fires (as described in the agricultural burn permit)
  • Local fire districts do not grant Native American ceremonial fire permits outside of tribal lands during air quality burn bans.

It is OK to use natural gas and propane grills, stoves, or inserts during a Stage 1 burn ban.

* The only exception to using fireplaces and uncertified wood stoves or inserts, is if the homeowner has a previously approved ‘No Other Adequate Source of Heat’ exemption from the Clean Air Agency

Everyone, and especially children, pregnant women, older adults, and those with heart and breathing problems should avoid physical exertion outdoors.  If possible, seek clean, air-conditioned indoor air  (e.g. public libraries, “cooling centers”,  community and senior centers).

The Washington State Department of Health recommends that people who are sensitive to air pollution limit time spent outdoors, especially when exercising. Air pollution can trigger asthma attacks, cause difficulty breathing, and make lung and heart problems worse. Air pollution is especially harmful to people with lung and heart problems, people with diabetes, children, and older adults (over age 65).

Visit pscleanair.org/burnban to view the current burn ban status and:

  • Download our free mobile app “Burn Ban 411
  • Find out what other alerts might be available in the area

For more information:

# # #

The Puget Sound Clean Air Agency is an air quality management agency serving King, Kitsap, Pierce and Snohomish counties. Created as a result of the 1967 Washington Clean Air Act, the agency protects public health by adopting and enforcing air quality regulations, educating individuals and businesses about clean-air choices and sponsoring voluntary initiatives to improve air quality.

The Agency fully complies with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and does not discriminate based on race, color, sex, or national origin in its programs and activities. In addition, the Agency also assures non-discrimination on the basis of creed, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, disability, marital, or veteran status. For more information, or to submit a title VI Complaint, go to www.pscleanair.org or call (206) 343-8800.

 

Air Quality Burn Ban Called For King, Kitsap, Pierce & Snohomish Counties

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 2, 2017

STAGE 1 AIR QUALITY BURN BAN CALLED FOR KING, KITSAP, PIERCE, & SNOHOMISH COUNTIES

All outdoor burning is prohibited until air quality improves

SEATTLE, WA – With the wildfire smoke from British Columbia in our region, the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency is issuing a Stage 1 air quality burn ban for King, Kitsap, Pierce, and Snohomish Counties, effective at 4 PM today, August 2, 2017.

This ban is in effect until further notice and is in addition to existing fire safety burn bans.

With winds from British Columbia moving wildfire smoke into our area, air pollution levels have become UNHEALTHY FOR SENSITIVE GROUPS in many parts of the Puget Sound region. We expect this pattern to continue at least through Friday and possibly longer.

The purpose of the burn ban is to reduce any additional harm to sensitive populations from excess air pollution and is in addition to existing fire safety burn bans. The Clean Air Agency will continue to closely monitor the situation for purposes of air quality burn bans.

No outdoor burning during a Stage 1 air quality burn ban including:
• No charcoal barbeques
• No fire pits, chimineas, fire bowls, or similar free-standing devices
• No campfires or bonfires
• No fireplaces, uncertified wood stoves, or uncertified inserts*
• No agricultural fires (as described in the agricultural burn permit)
• Native American ceremonial fire permits outside of tribal lands are not granted from the local fire district during air quality burn bans.
It is OK to use natural gas and propane stoves or inserts during a Stage 1 burn ban.

* The only exception to using fireplaces and uncertified wood stoves or inserts, is if the homeowner has a previously approved ‘No Other Adequate Source of Heat’ exemption from the Clean Air Agency

The Washington State Department of Health recommends that people who are sensitive to air pollution limit time spent outdoors, especially when exercising. Air pollution can trigger asthma attacks, cause difficulty breathing, and make lung and heart problems worse. Air pollution is especially harmful to people with lung and heart problems, people with diabetes, children, and older adults (over age 65).

Visit pscleanair.org/burnban to view the current burn ban status and:
• Download our free mobile app “Burn Ban 411”
• Find out what other alerts might be available in the area

For more information:
• Visit the “Frequently Asked Questions” tab on our Burn Ban Status page
• Visit our Clean Heating Choices page
• Visit the Our Air Quality page

# # #

The Puget Sound Clean Air Agency is an air quality management agency serving King, Kitsap, Pierce and Snohomish counties. Created as a result of the 1967 Washington Clean Air Act, the agency protects public health by adopting and enforcing air quality regulations, educating individuals and businesses about clean-air choices and sponsoring voluntary initiatives to improve air quality.

The Agency fully complies with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and does not discriminate based on race, color, sex, or national origin in its programs and activities. In addition, the Agency also assures non-discrimination on the basis of creed, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, disability, marital, or veteran status. For more information, or to submit a title VI Complaint, go to www.pscleanair.org or call (206) 343-8800.

DNR lifting burn ban west of the Cascades; East of the Cascades, burn ban will allow campfires

NOTE: Fire Safety Burn Bans enacted by local county agencies remain in effect until those agencies lift them. The DNR changes apply only to lands protected by DNR fire crews.

With continued fall weather conditions west of the Cascades, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is lifting the ban on outdoor burning on DNR-protected lands in western Washington, effective 12:01 a.m., Sept. 20.

The burn ban east of the Cascades has been eased in order to allow campfires in campfire pits in designated campgrounds only.

“The fall weather pattern shows us it’s time to lift western Washington’s burn ban,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark. “It will also permit us to ease the burn ban east of the Cascades by allowing campfires in some locations.”

There are exceptions. Due to continued high fire danger, campfires may not be allowed in some locations in northeast Washington.

Check before having a campfire
County burn bans may still be in effect in various locations throughout Washington, and residents should check with local fire districts for information. If campers and visitors are unsure about whether a campground is on DNR-protected land, they should check with local park authorities. Also, check with them on any campfire restrictions that may be in place.

Those choosing to have a campfire in allowed areas should:
•    Use an approved or provided fire pit only; don’t create a new one.
•    Keep the campfire small.
•    Keep plenty of water and a shovel nearby.
•    Never leave the campfire unattended.
•    To extinguish a campfire: drown with water, mix ashes, scrape partially-burned sticks and logs, and alternate drowning and mixing until cold. A campfire too hot to touch, is too hot to leave.

Fireworks and incendiary devices, such as exploding targets, sky lanterns, or tracer ammunition remain illegal on all DNR-protected lands.

Those who negligently allow fire to spread or who knowingly place forestlands in danger of destruction or damage are subject to possible civil liabilities and criminal penalties under state law. DNR, as well as anyone harmed by such a fire, may pursue damages that include loss of property and fire suppression costs.

The burn ban east of the Cascades will run through September 30, 2016 and applies to all lands under DNR fire protection east of the Cascade Mountains, which does not include federally owned lands.

 

For current information on burn restrictions, call 1-800-323-BURN or visit DNR’s webpage showing fire danger and burning restrictions by county: www. fortress.wa.gov/dnr/protection/firedanger/. For a description of activities prohibited by the burn ban, go to www.dnr.wa.gov/burn-bans.

 

For a copy of the Commissioner’s Order, go to http://www.dnr.wa.gov/burn-bans.

DNR eases burn ban to permit western Washington campfires

Fire danger still high in eastern Washington

OLYMPIA – Recent rains and cooler temperatures across western Washington are prompting the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to reduce campfire restrictions west of the Cascade Mountains. Effective Friday, Sept. 2, campfires will be allowed within approved fire pits in designated campgrounds on western Washington lands protected by DNR.

The campfire prohibition continues on DNR-protected lands across eastern Washington. The statewide ban on other outdoor burning, such as debris burning, also continues.

“With this wetter weather in western Washington, easing the burn ban in time to permit campfires over Labor Day weekend is the right thing to do,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark, who oversees DNR.

“There is still significant fire risk on the east side of the Cascades, however, so we can’t permit campfires there,” said Goldmark. “We ask the public to help firefighters by observing the burn ban, with this exception for westside campfires in approved fire pits.”

Those choosing to have a campfire in allowed areas should:

  • Use an approved or provided fire pit only; don’t create a new one.
  • Keep the campfire small.
  • Keep plenty of water and a shovel nearby.
  • Never leave the campfire unattended.
  • To extinguish a campfire: drown with water, mix ashes, scrape partially-burned sticks and logs, and alternate drowning and mixing until cold. A campfire too hot to touch, is too hot to leave.

Check local restrictions

Individual jurisdictions may have their own continued campfire bans. Check local restrictions, campground signs or with campground hosts before starting a campfire.

For current information on burn restrictions, call 1-800-323-BURN or visit DNR’s webpage showing fire danger and burning restrictions by county: www.fortress.wa.gov/dnr/protection/firedanger/. For a description of activities prohibited by the burn ban, go to www.dnr.wa.gov/burn-bans.

 DNR’s wildfire mission
Administered by Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark, DNR is the state’s largest on-call fire department, responsible for preventing and fighting wildfires on 13 million acres of private, state and tribal-owned forestlands in Washington. During fire season, DNR’s wildfire force includes more than 1,300 trained employees. DNR also participates in Washington’s coordinated interagency approach to firefighting.