Burn ban archives for: King County

DNR Bans all Recreational Fires and BBQs on state-protected lands — including State Parks

With the arrival this week of the most dangerous fire weather of the year, Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark is expanding the statewide burn ban effective noon today, Aug. 17 to prohibit all campfires on DNR-protected lands through Sept. 30, 2016.

“After a relatively mild summer, we are entering a period of critical fire weather on both sides of the Cascades,” said Goldmark. “The greatest fire danger right now comes from carelessness. It’s essential that people understand the risks involved and do not spark any fires.”

Goldmark sees special wildfire risk over the coming days throughout the state, as high-pressure weather patterns will keep away the marine moisture that normally limits the spread of wildfire. The ability of Washington’s forests and grasslands to resist wildfire remains weakened after last year’s record drought.

The statewide burn ban applies to state forests, state parks and forestlands protected by DNR firefighters. It prohibits all outdoor burning, including campfires in fire pits and the use of charcoal briquettes. Liquid gas or propane camp stoves that do not use solid briquettes and have on/off controls are permitted.

The statewide ban does not include federally-owned lands such as national forests, national parks, national wildlife refuges or other areas administered by federal agencies.

This fire season to date, there have been 527 fires on 3,372 acres. By comparison, at this point in 2015, there had been 803 fires burning 319,551 acres. In 2014 by this date, there were 590 fires burning 190,742 acres.

In 2015, a record drought, low snowpack and weeks of hot, dry weather brought Washington’s worst-ever wildfire season, burning more than a million acres across the state.

“Our fire crews have been effective so far this season in keeping fires small and getting them out quickly,” said Goldmark. “I ask all Washingtonians to give them a hand by being careful and responsible when working or playing on our iconic landscapes.”

DNR’s wildfire mission

Administered by Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark, DNR is the state’s largest on-call fire department, responsible for preventing and fighting wildfires on 13 million acres of private, state, and tribal-owned forestlands in Washington. During fire season, DNR’s wildfire force includes more than 1,300 trained employees. DNR also participates in Washington’s coordinated interagency approach to firefighting.

 

DNR Fire Danger Burn Ban in Effect STATE-WIDE

Outdoor burning off limits through Sept. 30
With the arrival of warm summer temperatures and below normal precipitation in western Washington, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has expanded its burn ban to cover the entire state.

The statewide burn ban will run from July 29 through Sept. 30. A burn ban for DNR-protected lands in eastern Washington has been in effect since July 2. The ban may be extended or shortened based on fire weather.

“The arrival of summer weather creates greater danger for wildfires, which are serious threats to safety, property and habitat. We have already seen a number of roadside fires start on both sides of the Cascades,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark. “We must be cautious and vigilant to minimize the damage to our state.”
The ban means outdoor burning is prohibited on all forestlands that DNR protects from wildfire. Anyone caught violating the burn ban can face fines. Prescribed ecological burns approved by DNR will be allowed if expressly approved by Commissioner Goldmark.
Recreational fires in approved fire pits within designated state, county, municipal and other campgrounds are allowed.
DNR’s burn ban does not apply to federally-owned lands, such as national forests, national parks, national wildlife refuges or other areas administered by federal agencies. Counties and local fire districts may have additional burn restrictions.
So far this year, DNR has had 408 wildfire starts throughout the state.
Fireworks and incendiary devices, such as exploding targets, sky lanterns, or tracer ammunition, are illegal on all DNR-protected forestlands.
For a copy of the Commissioner’s Order, go to http://www.dnr.wa.gov/burn-bans.
DNR’s wildfire mission 
Administered by Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark, DNR is the state’s largest on-call fire department, responsible for preventing and fighting wildfires on 13 million acres of private, state, and tribal-owned forestlands in Washington. During fire season, DNR’s wildfire force includes more than 1,300 trained employees. DNR also participates in Washington’s coordinated interagency approach to firefighting.
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Burn Ban Updates: Bans lifted in King & Snohomish Counties, Pierce County lowered to Stage 1; effective 2pm 1/3/2016 Get current status online at: http://bit.ly/1IK27Sp

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 3, 2016

BURN BANS LIFTED FOR SNOHOMISH AND KING COUNTIES

BURN BAN LOWERED TO STAGE 1 FOR GREATER PIERCE* COUNTY

SEATTLE, WA – Due to improved weather conditions, but with air pollution levels remaining an issue, the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency is lifting the bans in Snohomish and King Counties, and lowering Greater Pierce County* to a Stage 1 burn ban, effective 2:00 pm today, January 3, 2016.

This ban is in effect until further notice.

We expect to see some increase in winds in Snohomish County this afternoon.  Clouds and precipitation should keep air pollution from becoming trapped near the surface (an inversion) in areas of the region tonight. However, air pollution levels in Pierce County are expected to remain higher and the forecast is for little to no winds the rest of the night.  Without sufficient winds, and without a burn ban to reduce ongoing air pollution from wood burning, Pierce county will likely exceed the air pollution health standard.

* Pierce County residents on the “Pierce Peninsula” (Gig Harbor Fire #5, Key Peninsula #16, Anderson Island #27) and in “South Pierce” county (Roy Fire #17, Eatonville, Ashford #23) are not included in today’s burn ban. Check the Pierce County Burn Ban Area Map for more specific information.

The purpose of a burn ban is to reduce the amount of pollution that is creating unhealthy air usually due to excessive wood smoke. The Clean Air Agency will continue to closely monitor the situation.

During a Stage 1 burn ban:

  • No burning is allowed in wood-burning fireplaces, uncertified wood stoves or fireplace inserts. Residents should rely instead on their home’s other, cleaner source of heat (such as their furnace or electric baseboard heaters) for a few days until air quality improves, the public health risk diminishes and the ban is cancelled.
  • The only exception is if the homeowner has a previously approved ‘No Other Adequate Source of Heat’ designation from the Clean Air Agency
  • No outdoor fires are allowed. This includes recreational fires such as bonfires, campfires and the use of fire pits and chimineas.
  • Burn ban violations are subject to a $1,000 penalty.

It is OK to use natural gas and propane stoves or inserts during a Stage 1 burn ban.

During a Stage 2 burn ban:

  • No burning is allowed in any wood-burning fireplaces, certified or uncertified wood stoves or fireplace inserts. Residents should rely instead on their home’s other, cleaner source of heat (such as their furnace or electric baseboard heaters) for a few days until air quality improves, the public health risk diminishes and the ban is cancelled.
  • The only exception is if the homeowner has a previously approved ‘No Other Adequate Source of Heat’ designation from the Clean Air Agency
  • No outdoor fires are allowed. This includes recreational fires such as bonfires, campfires and the use of fire pits and chimineas.
  • Burn ban violations are subject to a $1,000 penalty.

It is OK to use natural gas and propane stoves or inserts during a Stage 2 burn ban.

The Washington State Department of Health recommends that people who are sensitive to air pollution limit time spent outdoors, especially when exercising. Air pollution can trigger asthma attacks, cause difficulty breathing, and make lung and heart problems worse. Air pollution is especially harmful to people with lung and heart problems, people with diabetes, children, and older adults (over age 65).

Visit www.pscleanair.org/burnban to view the current burn ban status, download our mobile app, and other burn ban alert options for you area.

The following burn ban status text message alerts are available in Pierce County:

  • All Pierce County text PIERCEBURN to 313131
  • Pierce Peninsula text PENINSULA to 313131
  • South Pierce County text SOUTHPIERCE to 313131

For more information:

  • Visit the “Frequently Asked Questions” tab on our Burn Ban Status page
  • Visit our Clean Heating Choices page
  • Visit the Our Air Quality page
  • Also get status updates on the go with the free Burn Ban 411 mobile app for Android and Apple: http://bit.ly/bb411

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The Puget Sound Clean Air Agency is an air quality management agency serving King, Kitsap, Pierce and Snohomish counties. Created as a result of the 1967 Washington Clean Air Act, the agency protects public health by adopting and enforcing air quality regulations, educating individuals and businesses about clean-air choices and sponsoring voluntary initiatives to improve air quality.

The Agency fully complies with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and does not discriminate based on race, color, sex, or national origin in its programs and activities. In addition, the Agency also assures non-discrimination on the basis of creed, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, disability, marital, or veteran status. For more information, or to submit a title VI Complaint, go to www.pscleanair.org or call (206) 343-8800.

EPA Announces Burn Bans for W WA

Outdoor Burn Ban Declared for Western Washington Tribal Reservations Starting January 1

(Seattle – December 31, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is declaring a ban on all outdoor open burning on the following Indian reservations in Washington State due to stagnant air conditions and elevated air pollution, effective at 8:00 a.m. on January 1, 2016. The burn bans will continue until revised or canceled.

Reservations of the following tribes are affected:

Lummi Nation Chehalis Tribe
Nooksack Indian Tribe Upper Skagit Indian Tribe
Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians
Tulalip Tribes Puyallup Tribe of Indians
Muckleshoot Indian Tribe Nisqually Indian Tribe
Port Gamble Indian Community Skokomish Indian Tribe
Squaxin Island Tribe Suquamish Tribe

The burn ban applies to all outdoor and agricultural burning, including camping and recreational fires, in all areas, regardless of ownership or tribal membership, within external reservation boundaries. Ceremonial and traditional fires are exempt from the burn ban. For areas outside reservation boundaries, please contact your local clean air agency, fire department, or the Washington State Department of Ecology.

EPA requests that reservation residents reduce all sources of air pollution as much as possible, including excess driving and idling of vehicles, and the use of woodstoves and fireplaces, unless they are the only adequate source of heat.

Air pollution can have significant health impacts. Cooperation from the community will help people who are most at risk during this period, including children, the elderly, pregnant women, people with asthma or difficulty breathing, diabetes, or heart problems. Those sensitive groups should avoid outdoor exercise and minimize exposure to outdoor pollution as much as possible. Under the most severe pollution levels all residents should restrict their activities.

An earlier burn ban remains in effect for the Yakama Nation Reservation in Eastern Washington.

To check conditions in your area, go to http://www.airnow.gov/ or https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/enviwa/.

For current burn ban status, please visit: https://waburnbans.net/ or contact EPA at 1-800-424-4372 or by email to R10_farrhotline@epa.gov.

Find more information online at: http://yosemite.epa.gov/R10/tribal.nsf/programs/farr-burn-bans.