Burn ban archives for: Clark County

For more information on current Burn Bans within this county, contact the Southwest Clean Air Agency, 11815 NE 99th Street, Suite 1294, Vancouver, WA 98682: (360) 574-3058 http://www.swcleanair.org/

DNR restrictions lifted in Pacific, Lewis, Cowlitz, Clark, Skamania, and Wahkiakum Counties

Effective at 0800 hours on May 15, 2019, the fire danger is LOW.

All silviculture burning requires a permit from the DNR if the pile is larger than 10 feet by 10 feet. Follow the conditions of your permit. Call 800-323-BURN daily before lighting any pile. There are no restrictions on recreational fires.

Multiple Counties impose ban on debris burning starting May 8, 2019

With temperatures expected to be above normal this weekend, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announced an increase in fire danger rating on DNR-protected lands in southwest Washington.

“Fire season is here. These hot temperatures can rob our forests of moisture, setting the stage for more wildfires,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz. “While we can’t do anything to stop fires started by natural causes, we all play a role in preventing wildfires while enjoying the outdoors. Make sure to douse your campfires, don’t park in dry grass and tighten tow chains so they don’t drag on roadways.”

As of midnight last night, Thurston, Mason, Pierce, King, Kitsap, Skamania, Clark, Cowlitz, Lewis, Pacific, and Wahkiakum counties in Western Washington have imposed a temporary ban on debris burning in these counties. At the same time, fire danger in all those counties increased from low to moderate. Other than the southern portions of Garfield, Columbia, and Asotin Counties (i.e. the Blue Mountains), all eastern Washington Counties are also at Moderate Fire Danger.

The forecasted combination of dry landscape and warm weather has fire officials concerned as the weekend approaches. Current conditions are drier than normal, and grasses, brush, and trees are unusually receptive to fire starts.

Debris burning is not allowed within any  MODERATE fire danger county. Campfires may be allowed in approved designated campgrounds. Always check with local campground hosts before lighting a campfire.

Target shooting is currently allowed during the day on most DNR-managed lands in areas with an unobstructed, earth backstop that can safely stop all bullets.

Those who do target shooting are urged to pack out all shells, brass, paper, and other debris. Exploding targets and fireworks are not allowed on DNR-protected lands.

Check https://fortress.wa.gov/dnr/protection/firedanger/ for any changes in fire danger.

 

DNR’s wildfire mission

Administered by Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz, DNR is responsible for preventing and fighting wildfires on 13 million acres of private, state and tribal-owned forestlands. DNR is the state’s largest on-call fire department, with more than 800 permanent DNR employees available and another 550 seasonal firefighters hired for the summer season.

 

Nov. 15: Air Quality Burn Ban, Stage 1, Called in Clark County

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the Southwest Clean Air Agency have issued air quality advisories for much of Oregon and Southwest Washington. Smoke from local wood stoves and other sources have combined to create unhealthy air quality in many parts of the region.

The National Weather Service expects winds to clear smoke from the Willamette Valley starting Friday evening. South of Eugene and other parts of the state may continue to experience stagnant air conditions and poor air quality through the weekend.

Local smoke levels can rise and fall rapidly, depending on fire activity and weather factors including wind direction.

View current air quality conditions at DEQ’s Air Quality Index https://oraqi.deq.state.or.us/home/map or by downloading the Oregon air app on smartphones.

Many local jurisdictions are under wood burning restrictions, limiting the use of wood stoves, fireplaces, and outdoor firepits. There are often exceptions for those who use wood exclusively to heat their homes and those with limited income. Check with your local health or air agency for current restrictions. Areas under active wood stove restrictions include:

The Oregon Health Authority urges residents of affected communities to take steps to avoid health problems during smoky conditions, including:

  • Avoid strenuous outdoor activities when air quality is unhealthy.
  • Those with heart or lung problems, as well as young children, are especially vulnerable. These people should stay indoors while smoke levels are high.
  • True high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and non-ozone producing electrostatic precipitator (ESP) air cleaners and filters can help keep indoor air cleaner.
  • Reduce other sources of indoor smoke. Avoid burning cigarettes and candles; using gas, propane, wood-burning stoves and furnaces; cooking; and vacuuming.
  • If you have heart disease or lung disease, such as asthma, follow your healthcare provider’s advice about prevention and treatment of symptoms.

DNR lifts all burn restrictions in most Western Washington Counties as of 10/2/18

Effective 10/2/2018 the fire danger for is Low so the seasonal DNR Fire Safety Burn Bans have been lifted  in the following counties:

  • Clallam
  • Clark
  • Cowlitz
  • Grays Harbor
  • Island
  • Jefferson
  • King
  • Kitsap
  • Mason
  • Pacific
  • Pierce
  • San Juan
  • Skagit
  • Skamania
  • Snohomish
  • Thurston
  • Wahkiakum
  • Whatcom

If you have a written burning permit from DNR, burning is allowed subject to the conditions of your permit.

you have questions or would like to obtain a DNR burning permit for silvicultural burning, please call Olympic Region DNR at 360-374-2800. Fireworks and incendiary devices such as exploding targets, sky lanterns or tracer ammunition are always illegal on all DNR protected lands, which includes unimproved private property.