Burn ban archives for: Clallam County

Clallam County enacts Fire Safety Burn Ban effective July 1, 2018

The Clallam County Burn Restrictions will take effect July 1, 2018 and run through October 1, 2018, unless conditions warrant an earlier closure.

The Burn Restriction applies to all outdoor burning except recreational fires used for pleasure, religious, ceremonial, warmth, cooking or similar purposes. Recreational fires are permitted unless further banned by extreme weather conditions.

Note: Recreational fires are limited to 3-feet in diameter and 2-feet in height. Fires for debris disposal are not legal under any circumstances and are not considered recreational.

If conditions arise the restrictions may be upgraded to a HIGH FIRE DANGER, this will prohibit all outdoor burning which includes recreational fires. The exception is within the Olympic National Park and other controlled campgrounds.

Contact your local fire district for more information or visit our website at www.clallam.net

 

Stage 1 Burn Ban LIFTED in Clallam County

Due to improved air quality conditions and changing weather, the Stage One Burn Ban has been LIFTED in Clallam County effective immediately (Thursday, Dec.14, 2017).

A substantial reduction in smoke output due at least in part to the great public response to the called ban, has moved Air Quality conditions back into the “Green” on the Washington Air Quality Advisory (WAQA) scale (see real-time air quality conditions HERE).

To stay up-to-date on burn bans throughout Washington, visit waburnbans.net and for all air quality issues, visit ORCAA at www.orcaa.org.

Stage 1 Burn Ban called for Eastern Clallam County (12/11/17), continued in Thurston Co.

A Stage One Burn Ban is being called for the portion of Clallam County east of the Elwha River effective 1 p.m. today (Monday, Dec. 11, 2017) and continuing until conditions warrant a change. All of Thurston County remains under a Stage 1 Burn Ban as well.

Under a Stage 1 Ban, no burning is allowed in fireplaces or uncertified wood stoves, and all outdoor burning is prohibited, even in areas where outdoor burning is not permanently banned. Additionally, no visible smoke is allowed from any woodstove or fireplace, certified or not, beyond a 20-minute start-up period.

A system of stable weather conditions over Western Washington, coupled with cold overnight temperatures has resulted in air pollution levels climbing enough to raise concerns about the air quality and its impacts on health. A change in weather will be needed to restore cleaner air quality, yet that’s not forecast to occur until late this week at least.

While pollution levels in Thurston and eastern Clallam Counties warrants the Stage One Ban, other counties within the jurisdiction of the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency (ORCAA) haven’t reached that level. To avoid bans in their areas, the residents of Mason and Jefferson Counties are asked to voluntarily refrain from all outdoor burning, and to use safe alternatives to wood heat if possible.

Of particular concern are fine particles released by smoke from wood stoves and fireplaces. The Washington State Department of Health recommends that people who are sensitive to air pollution limit time spent outdoors. Air pollution can trigger asthma attacks, cause difficulty breathing, and make lung and heart problems worse. Air pollution is especially harmful to children, people with heart and lung problems, and adults over age 65.

Olympic Region Clean Air Agency staff will continue to monitor the situation to determine when the burn ban can be lifted. In the meantime, here are some other things people can do to help protect the air we breathe:

  • If you have a certified wood stove or fireplace insert, make sure you are using it properly so you don’t produce excess chimney smoke. Excess smoke is always illegal. To learn more about clean burning techniques or upgrading to a certified, pellet, natural gas or propane stove, visit http://www.epa.gov/ burnwise/
  • To determine if your stove is certified, visit http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/air/indoor_woodsmoke/pdfs/Wood_stoves.pdf
  • Limit your driving as much as possible, since vehicles are a big source of air pollution year round. Check air-quality forecasts and current conditions HERE

For more information about Burn Ban regulations, you may refer to Chapter 173-433 of the Washington Administrative Code.

DNR Lifts Burn Restrictions in Pacific Region effective Oct. 1, 2017

Effective 0001 October 11, 2017 fire danger rating will be reduced to low.

If you have a written burning permit from DNR, burning is allowed subject to the conditions of your permit. For land clearing and residential backyard burning, please contact Olympic Region Clean Air Agency at 1-800-422-5623 for burning regulations.

If you have questions or would like to obtain a DNR burning permit for silvicultural burning, please call Olympic Region DNR at 360-374-2800.

https://www.dnr.wa.gov/burn-restrictions