Category Archives: Burn Bans

DNR restrictions lifted in Thurson & Mason Counties

Effective at 0800 hours on May 18, 2019, the fire danger is LOW in Thurston and Mason Counties.

All silviculture burning requires a permit from the DNR if the pile is larger than 10 feet by 10 feet. Follow the conditions of your permit. Call 800-323-BURN daily before lighting any pile. There are no restrictions on recreational fires.

Check DNR’s interactive map for real-time updates: https://fortress.wa.gov/dnr/protection/firedanger/

Multiple Counties impose ban on debris burning starting May 8, 2019

With temperatures expected to be above normal this weekend, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announced an increase in fire danger rating on DNR-protected lands in southwest Washington.

“Fire season is here. These hot temperatures can rob our forests of moisture, setting the stage for more wildfires,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz. “While we can’t do anything to stop fires started by natural causes, we all play a role in preventing wildfires while enjoying the outdoors. Make sure to douse your campfires, don’t park in dry grass and tighten tow chains so they don’t drag on roadways.”

As of midnight last night, Thurston, Mason, Pierce, King, Kitsap, Skamania, Clark, Cowlitz, Lewis, Pacific, and Wahkiakum counties in Western Washington have imposed a temporary ban on debris burning in these counties. At the same time, fire danger in all those counties increased from low to moderate. Other than the southern portions of Garfield, Columbia, and Asotin Counties (i.e. the Blue Mountains), all eastern Washington Counties are also at Moderate Fire Danger.

The forecasted combination of dry landscape and warm weather has fire officials concerned as the weekend approaches. Current conditions are drier than normal, and grasses, brush, and trees are unusually receptive to fire starts.

Debris burning is not allowed within any  MODERATE fire danger county. Campfires may be allowed in approved designated campgrounds. Always check with local campground hosts before lighting a campfire.

Target shooting is currently allowed during the day on most DNR-managed lands in areas with an unobstructed, earth backstop that can safely stop all bullets.

Those who do target shooting are urged to pack out all shells, brass, paper, and other debris. Exploding targets and fireworks are not allowed on DNR-protected lands.

Check https://fortress.wa.gov/dnr/protection/firedanger/ for any changes in fire danger.

 

DNR’s wildfire mission

Administered by Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz, DNR is responsible for preventing and fighting wildfires on 13 million acres of private, state and tribal-owned forestlands. DNR is the state’s largest on-call fire department, with more than 800 permanent DNR employees available and another 550 seasonal firefighters hired for the summer season.

 

Temporary Outdoor Burning Restrictions In Pacific County as of May 8, 2019

Pacific County is implementing a temporary “Burn Ban” effective at midnight tonight, May 8, 2019. Pacific County Fire Districts and Fire Departments in cooperation with the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) along with other SW Washington Counties will be enacting restrictions on all outdoor burning – including residential yard waste burning as well as Land Clearing Burning – on a temporary basis until conditions moderate. All residential burning and land clearing burning is be prohibited until further notice.

Recreational campfires are allowed if built in improved fire pits in designated campgrounds, such as those typically found in local, county, and state parks and in commercial campgrounds. On private land, campfires are permitted with the landowner’s permission if built in the following approved manner:

  • The campfire shall be no greater than 3-feet in diameter and constructed of a ring of metal, stone or brick 8-inches above the ground surface, with a 2-foot- wide area cleared down to exposed soil surrounding the outside of the pit.
  • The campfire shall have an area at least 10-feet around it cleared of all flammable material and at least 20-feet of clearance from overhead flammable materials or fuels.
  • The campfire must be attended at all times by a responsible person at least 16-years old with the ability to extinguish the fire with a shovel and a 5-gallon bucket of water or with a connected and charged water hose.

Completely extinguish campfires by pouring water or moist soil in them and stirring with a shovel until all parts are cool to the touch. The use of self-contained camp stoves is encouraged as an alternative.

Please contact your local fire district for further information and also the Washington State Department of Natural Resources for updates on burn restrictions at 1-800-323-BURN or visit their website at www2.wadnr.gov/burn-risk. Contact ORCAA at 1-800-422-5623 or visit their website at www.orcaa.org.

You can also contact our office in Long Beach at 360-642-9382; or South Bend at 360-875-9356.

EPA Declares Outdoor Burn Ban for Yakama Reservation – March 7, 2019

EPA Declares Outdoor Burn Ban for Yakama Reservation

(Seattle – Thursday March 7, 2019) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10, in coordination with the Confederated Tribes of the Yakama Nation (Yakama Nation) has called for a burn ban on all outdoor open burning on the Yakama Reservation due to stagnant air conditions and elevated air pollution, until further notice.

The burn ban applies to all outdoor and agricultural burning—including camping and recreational fires—in all areas within external reservation boundaries regardless of ownership or tribal membership. Ceremonial and traditional fires are exempt from the burn ban. For areas outside reservation boundaries, please contact your local clean air agency, fire department, or the Washington State Department of Ecology.

EPA and the Yakama Nation requests that reservation residents reduce all sources of air pollution as much as possible, including driving and idling of vehicles.

Air pollution can harm your health and can have lasting effects. Community cooperation with the ban will help people who are most at risk, including children, the elderly, pregnant women, people with asthma or difficulty breathing, diabetes, heart problems or otherwise compromised health. These sensitive groups should avoid outdoor exercise and minimize exposure to outdoor pollution as much as possible. Under the most severe pollution levels all residents should restrict their activities.

The burn ban is effective immediately. This burn ban may be downgraded or removed depending on air quality and weather conditions. Please check our website for the latest information: https://www.epa.gov/farr/burn-bans-indian-reservations-id-or-and-wa

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To check conditions in your area, go to http://www.airnow.gov/ .

For current burn ban status, please visit https://waburnbans.net/, the tribal air quality office at (509) 865-5121 Ext. 6078 or 1-509-945-6675, or the EPA at 1-800-424-4372, email to R10_farrhotline@epa.gov.

Find more information online, go to https://www.epa.gov/farr