Fire danger and fire precaution level increases in northeast Washington

The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announced today the following changes in fire danger rating and industrial fire precaution levels (IFPL) on DNR-protected lands.
Effective Wednesday, July 11, 2018:
  • Fire danger will increase from low to moderate in Pend Oreille and Ferry counties and Stevens County outside fire districts 1 and 2.
  • Fire danger will increase from moderate to high in Lincoln and Spokane counties and Stevens County inside fire districts 1 and 2.
  • Fire danger remains high in Okanogan County.
Effective Wednesday, July 11, 2018:
  • IFPL will increase to a Level 2 in zone 684.
  • IFPL will remain a Level 1 in zones 678W, 678E, 685, 686 and 687 and 688.
Daily updates on burn restrictions and Industrial Fire Precaution Levels are available at 1-800-323-BURN or on the Fire Danger and Outdoor Burning risk map at www.dnr.wa.gov/burn-restrictions and Industrial Fire Precaution Levels map www.dnr.wa.gov/IFPL.
The IFPL system
Industrial Fire Precaution Levels apply to all industrial operations that might cause a fire on or adjacent to lands protected from fire by DNR (WAC 332-24-301); this applies to logging, road construction and other industrial operations.
The levels are established for each of the 38 “shutdown zones” in the state on the basis of National Fire Danger Rating System data.
There are four IFPL levels:
  • Level 1(closed season):  fire equipment and a fire watch are required
  • Level 2 (partial hoot owl):  limits certain activities to between 8 p.m. and 1 p.m.; fire equipment and a fire watch are required
  • Level 3 (partial shutdown):  prohibits some activities and limits others to between 8 p.m. and 1 p.m.; fire equipment and a fire watch are required
  • Level 4 (general shutdown):  prohibits all activities

DNR leadership and wildfire mission

The Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz and DNR are responsible for preventing and fighting wildfires on 13 million acres of private, state and tribal-owned forestlands. DNR is the state’s largest wildland fire department, with more than 1,000 employees trained and available to be dispatched to fires as needed. During fire season, this includes more than 800 DNR employees who have other permanent jobs with the agency and about 550 seasonal employees hired for firefighting duties.
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